Oriental ceramics & works of art

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Stock number:

AW74

 

Period:

17th century

 

Type:

European Ceramics

 

Size:

Height: 33 cm; 13 in

 

Price:

p.o.a.

 

Availability:

Sold

 

Object Details

 

Item name:

A FINE AND RARE BLUE AND WHITE DELFT JUG

 

A FINE AND RARE BLUE AND WHITE DELFT JUG

 

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Description:

Of globular form, the slightly widening neck with a gentle spout, and a c-shaped handle starting at the top of the neck and finishing on the upper part of the body, painted in the Chinese transitional style in blue and outlined in black, with on the body a continuous scene set in a rocky landscape of two oriental figures, one standing, one seated on the ground, and two large, in relation to the figures, magnificent animated fantastical beasts, crouching facing each other on each side of a tall plant issuing from the ground, the beasts with large eyes, wide open mouths revealing thin reptile-like tongues and fangs, and long curling thin tails, around the shoulder a band of scrolling flowers and leaves, the neck with two large upright ?Dutch? or Iznik-like flowers, divided by a pendant band of blue dots, the looped handle decorated on the outside with scrollwork, around the foot a band of little squares creating a pattern, the base glazed and marked in black on yellow with P.15.
Period: Late 17th, Early 18th Century either Dutch or German

Provenance: Estate of the late Serena, Lady Matheson, Collection of Harold Peto at Iford Manor, Bradford on Avon, Wiltshire.

 

Footnote:

Footnote: This jug previously belonged to a collection of blue and white pottery that has been on loan to the National Trust at Dyrham Park, Gloucestershire for over thirty years. It originally came from the collection of Harold Peto at Iford Manor, Bradford on Avon, Wiltshire and then descended to his great-niece Serena, Lady Matheson.

For an example of the same shape see Jan Daniel van Dam, Delffse Porceleyne ? Dutch Delftware 1620 ? 1850, published by Waanders, Rijks Museum, Amsterdam, p. 61, illustrating the chapter ?Artistic and technical zenith 1680 -1720; The twenty most exciting years 1680 ? 1720.? ?A selection of new shapes and new decoration was produced to the highest possible standard.? In this chapter also see illustrations of Chinese decorations taken from the Wan-li and Transitional periods.
For another illustration of the same shape in Delft ceramics see C.H. De Jonge, Delft Ceramics, Pall Mall Press, London, 1970, p 30 -31.

Quote Jessica Harrison-Hall, Ming Ceramics in the British Museum, the British Museum press, 2001: ?Tulips were introduced to Holland from Turkey via Vienna between 1573 and 1587. However, between 1634 and 1637 speculative prices for tulip bulbs ran so high that a rare variety could fetch a fortune in florins. About this time the tulip begins to appear as a decorative motif on both Delft and Chinese porcelain.?